For your DIGESTIVE HEALTH! Specialized Internal Program

Maintaining your gastrointestinal health is important.

Herbalife® Digestive Health products support healthy digestion and elimination, and help relieve occasional indigestion, helping to ensure your internal system runs smoothly every day.

Specialized Internal Program – 3 Products:

Ready Herbal Aloe, gallon;

Schizandra Plus;

Florafiber

140324_Specialized Internal Program _400

Overview

Daily inner maintenance to support a healthy digestive system.

Key Benefits
  • Includes premium-quality aloe vera from Ready Herbal Aloe and fiber from Florafiber to support digestive health.
  • Vitamins A (as beta-carotene), C and E from Schizandra Plus provide antioxidant support.
Product Label (PDF)
This program combines three of our prime formulas:
Ready Herbal Aloe,
Florafiber and
Schizandra Plus.
 #1035
$81.40
ORDER YOURS TODAY!
SABRINA
INDEPENDENT HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR SINCE 1994
Solutions for Weight Management, SPORTS Nutrition, Beauty and LIFESTYLE
Helping you enjoy a healthy, active and successful life!

https://www.goherbalife.com/goherb/

http://dallas.goherb.eu/

Call: (+1)2143290702

 

For your DIGESTIVE HEALTH! Keep your system on track with our 3-in-1 Starter Kit.

For your DIGESTIVE HEALTH try our Digestive Health Program Starter Kit!

140324_Digestive_Health_Program Mango

Digestive Health Program

Overview

Keep your system on track with our 3-in-1 Starter Kit.

Includes 4 Products:

Herbal Aloe Concentrate (Natural or Mango flavor),

21-Day Herbal Balancing Program (AM/PM companion formulas)

and Florafiber.

Key Benefits
  • Includes premium-quality aloe vera from Herbal Aloe Concentrate to soothe the stomach and support healthy digestion.
  • Fiber from Florafiber to support digestive health.
  • Milk thistle, an ingredient in AM Renew Formula, is traditionally used for liver support.
  • Dandelion, an ingredient in PM Reset Formula, is traditionally used for healthy fluid balance.
Product Label (PDF)

Our 3-in-1 Digestive Health Program supports healthy gastrointestinal function. Maintaining your gastrointestinal health is important. Herbalife® Digestive Health products support healthy digestion and elimination helping to ensure your internal system runs smoothly every day.

Digestive Health Program (Starter Kit) –

21-Day Herbal Cleansing Program;

Herbal Aloe Concentrate, Original or Mango;

Florafiber

#1219 Original Flavor 1 program

#1220 Mango Flavor 1 Program

$80.35

ORDER YOUR STARTER KIT TODAY!

SABRINA
INDEPENDENT HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR SINCE 1994
Solutions for Weight Management, SPORTS Nutrition, Beauty and LIFESTYLE
Helping you enjoy a healthy, active and successful life!

https://www.goherbalife.com/goherb/

http://dallas.goherb.eu/

Call: (+1)2143290702

 

NEW PRODUCT! Try ALOE with a CRANBERRY twist!

A NEW FLAVOR HAS BEEN ADDED TO OUR HERBALIFE ALOE PRODUCT LINE!

TRY ALOE WITH A CRANBERRY TWIST!

NOW AVAILABLE!

1189_HAC_Cranberry_Launch_02 2015a  1189_HAC_Cranberry_US1189_HAC_Cranberry_Slider_USENa

 

Herbal Aloe Concentrate

Overview

Herbal Aloe Concentrate contains aloe thatsoothes the stomach and supports nutrient absorption and intestinal health.

Key Benefits
  • Soothes the stomach
  • Supports healthy digestion
  • Relieves occasional indigestion
  • Supports nutrient absorption and intestinal health
Details

Herbal Aloe Concentrate is made with aloe which helps support healthy digestion.

Usage

Mix 3 capfuls (1/2 fl. oz.) with  4 fl. oz. of water. To prepare 1 quart of drink, mix 1/2 cup concentrate with 1 quart of water. Add to your favorite beverage. Refrigerate after opening.

Fast Facts
  • Made from premium-quality aloe vera.
  • Free from bitter-tasting aloin.*
  • Choose from concentrate, powder and ready-to-drink options.

*Contains less than 0.1 ppm aloin as consumed when 3 capfuls are mixed with 4 oz. of water.

16 OZ (473 ml)
#1189
$35.30
Try also:
Herbal Aloe Powder Mango
 Herbal Aloe Mango  Herbal Aloe Concentrate   Ready Herbal Aloe
Aloe Mango Bottle1Mango Flavor
ALL our Aloe Products are
  • Made from premium-quality aloe vera.
  • Free from bitter-tasting aloin.*
  • Choose from concentrate, powder and ready-to-drink options.
ORDER TODAY!
SABRINA
INDEPENDENT HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR SINCE 1994
Solutions for Weight Management, SPORTS Nutrition, Beauty and LIFESTYLE
Helping you enjoy a healthy, active and successful life!

https://www.goherbalife.com/goherb/

http://dallas.goherb.eu/

Call: (+1)2143290702

 Sasa 2010_HER

 

What are carbohydrates and how many ‘carbs’ do you need? by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND

What are carbohydrates and how many ‘carbs’ do you need?

Posted by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND

What are carbohydrates and how many 'carbs' do you need? | Herbalife Nutrition AdviceDo you have a good handle on carbohydrates? Essentially, you get carbohydrates from a wide range of foods, and you need them to keep your body’s engine running.

Just what are carbs, anyway? As much as people talk about carbohydrates, you’d think that everyone actually knows wherewe get our “carbs” and how much carbohydrate we should be eating every day – or not. In truth, carbohydrates have been both praised and punished… in part because they’re largely misunderstood.

Carbs explained

When I say the word, “carb” you probably picture starchy foods like noodles, bread, rice and potatoes. And you’d be right. But you’d be just as right if fruits or vegetables popped into your head. And you’d still be right if you thought of sugar or honey or jam…or even a glass of milk. That’s because lots of foods supply carbohydrate – and it’s a good thing, too. Because when it comes to keeping your engine running, your body’s first choice of fuel isn’t fat or protein – it’s carbohydrate.

We get our carbs from a wide range of foods – but clearly some of them are healthier for us than others. That’s why you sometimes hear people refer to different carbs as being ‘good’ or ‘bad’. What they’re trying to say is that the “good” carbohydrates are those that are the least processed – foods like whole fruits, vegetables, dairy products, beans and whole grains. Dairy products also fall in this category because foods like lowfat milk, yogurt and cottage cheese deliver carbohydrate to the body in the form of naturally-occurring sugars.

The other reason these carbs are “good” is that they provide more than just energy to the body. There’s also vitamins and minerals tagging along – and in the case of fruits, vegetables, beans and grains, we also pick up some fiber and antioxidants, too.

On the other hand, the highly processed refined “bad” carbs – foods like sugars, pastries, white rice, and white flour breads, cereals, pasta and crackers – have little to offer the body beyond just calories. That’s why it’s best to steer towards the whole fruits, veggies, whole grains and beans to meet your carbohydrate needs.

How much carbohydrate do you need?

Sometimes people ask me how much carbohydrate they should eat every day. It’s not a simple question to answer. That’s because the amount of carbohydrate you need to eat depends, in large part, on how many calories you burn every day – but it also depends on how active you are. Generally speaking, it’s suggested that you aim to eat roughly half your calories from carbohydrate. But, if you do a lot of extensive exercise, you might need a bit more. Some people try a very low carb approach to weight loss, but it often backfires. When you cut your intake too far, you may not provide your body with enough carbohydrate to fuel your active lifestyle.

You can estimate your carbohydrate needs fairly simply. If you eat 1600 calories a day, about half of your calories should come from carbohydrate – which, in this case, would be about 800 calories a day from carbohydrate. Since every gram of carbohydrate has 4 calories, you’d divide your suggested carbohydrate calories by 4 to figure out how many grams you should eat per day. In this case, 800 calories of carbohydrate is 200 grams.

But keep in mind that you could eat through your carb budget pretty quickly if most of your carbs are supplied by less healthy foods like desserts, sodas, white bread, crackers and potato chips. So keep your eye on the carbohydrate prize – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and dairy products should be the major sources of carbohydrate in your diet.

Here’s a guide to the amount of carbohydrate you should aim for daily, along with a list of some “healthy” carbohydrate foods with their carbohydrate content. Remember, though, that needs vary from person to person. If, for example, you do a lot of endurance exercise most days of the week, you may need a higher percentage of your daily calories from carbohydrate in order to get enough fuel for such a high level of activity.

Learn your personal carb needs

Daily calorie needs             Suggested daily carbohydrate intake (50% of calories)

1200                                                    150 grams

1400                                                    175 grams

1600                                                    200 grams

1800                                                    225 grams

2000                                                    250 grams

2200                                                    275 grams

2400                                                    300 grams

Essential guide to carb levels in common foods

Food
Serving Size
Carbohydrate (grams)
Fruits
Apricots 3 whole 12
Apple 1 medium 25
Blackberries 1 cup (150g) 14
Blueberries 1 cup (150g) 21
Cantaloupe 1 cup cubes (150g) 13
Grapes 1 cup (150g) 27
Grapefruit ½ medium fruit 11
Kiwi 1 average 10
Mango ½ large 25
Nectarine 1 medium 15
Orange 1 medium 18
Papaya 1 cup cubes (150g) 16
Peach 1 medium 15
Pear 1 medium 27
Pineapple 1 cup, diced (150g) 22
Plums 2 small 15
Strawberries 1 cup, sliced (150g) 13
Tangerine 1 medium 12
Watermelon 1 cup balls (150g) 12
Vegetables (cooked, unless otherwise noted)
Artichoke 1 medium 14
Asparagus 1 cup (180g) 8
Beets 1 cup (160g) 16
Broccoli, cooked, chopped 1 cup (185) 10
Broccoli, raw 1 cup (70g) 4
Brussels Sprouts 1 cup (150g) 11
Cabbage, cooked 1 cup (150g) 8
Cabbage, raw 1 cup (70g) 4
Cauliflower, cooked, chopped 1 cup (120g) 5
Cauliflower, raw, chopped 1 cup (100g) 5
Carrots, cooked 1 cup slices (150g) 13
Carrots, raw 1 large 7
Celery 2 large stalks 4
Corn 1 ear 14
Cucumber 1 medium 4
Eggplant 1 cup cubes (100g) 9
Green beans 1 cup (125g) 10
Green peas 1 cup (160g) 25
Kale, cooked, chopped 1 cup (130g) 7
Kale, raw, chopped 1 cup (65g) 5
Leeks 1 cup (100g) 8
Lettuce, shredded 1 cup (50g) 2
Mushrooms, cooked 1 cup (150g) 8
Mushrooms, raw 1 cup sliced (70g) 2
Onion, cooked 1 cup (200) 21
Peppers, chopped, cooked 1 cup (135g) 9
Peppers, chopped, raw 1 cup (150) 9
Spinach, cooked 1 cup (180g) 7
Spinach, raw 1 cup (30g) 1
Tomatoes, cooked 1 cup (100g) 13
Tomatoes, raw, chopped 1 cup (150g) 7
Winter squash 1 cup (250g) 22
Zucchini (summer squash) 1 cup (180g) 5
Grains, Beans, Starches
Beans (black, pinto, etc.) ½ cup, cooked (85g) 20
Brown Rice ½ cup, cooked (100g) 22
Lentils ½ cup, cooked (100g) 20
Potato, baked 1 medium 36
Quinoa ½ cup, cooked (100g) 20
Spaghetti, whole wheat ½ cup, cooked (70g) 18
Bread, Whole Grain 1 slice 14
Dairy Products
Cottage cheese 1 cup (225g) 8
Milk, nonfat or lowfat 1 cup (250ml) 12
Soy Milk, plain 1 cup (250ml) 8
Yogurt, plain, nonfat 1 cup (250g) 19

Written by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD. Susan is a paid consultant for Herbalife. 

Susan Bowerman

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HERBALIFE= NUTRITION FOR A BETTER LIFE!
To learn more about our Herbalife healthy
(SPORTS-) NUTRITION, to become a HERBALIFE MEMBER/DISTRIBUTOR
and for your orders you are welcome to contact me:
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since 1994
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What to eat before you work out- by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND

What to eat before you work out

Posted by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND 

What to eat before you work out | Herbalife nutrition and fitness adviceThe right fuel before you work out might can help you perform at your best.

Do you love your morning workouts, but hate to eat breakfast before heading out? Do you forget to have an afternoon snack before your evening run? One of the keys to good exercise performance is eating the right foods at the right time. Which is why it’s always amazing to me how many athletes simply don’t pay attention to what they eat (if they even eat at all) before they work out. After all, these are folks who should know better.

And yet, I run into athletes all the time who either don’t refuel properly or don’t fuel up adequately before working out. Some who work out in the morning say they don’t eat because they’re not hungry in the morning (translation: they’d rather catch a few extra minutes of sleep). Those who work out right before dinner figure their lunch meal has them covered, so they don’t bother with an afternoon snack.

Why You Should Eat Before You Work Out

People often liken the body’s engine to that of your car, so let’s stick with that for a moment. If you’re headed out on a road trip, it’s a good idea to start out with a full gas tank. Maybe you gassed up a couple of days ago and you’ve still got some fuel in the tank – but if you’re smart, you’ll top it off before you go so you don’t run the risk of running out. Same thing goes with your body’s engine. If you swim laps for an hour first thing in the morning, you might figure you’ve still got enough fuel in your tank from last night’s dinner. You might – but you’d probably be a lot better off if you topped off the tank before heading to the pool.

Your body relies on a good store of carbohydrate to maintain blood sugar while you exercise – but after an overnight fast, those stores could be running low. So eating before a hard workout can help provide enough fuel for working muscles. There’s a practical reason for eating before a long workout, too – it keeps you from getting hungry while you work out.

What You Should Eat Before You Work Out

Since carbs are so important to your body’s engine, your pre-workout meal should be relatively high in carbohydrate. A little bit of protein is good, too. It will slow digestion just a little bit – enough to allow the carbs to enter the bloodstream a little more slowly and steadily. On the other hand, you don’t want to eat a lot of fat right before you head out – it can slow digestion too much and leave you feeling uncomfortably full. And save your high fiber foods for afterwards, too, since they also take a while to work their way through your system.

As far as what specific foods you eat – there are no hard and fast rules. A smoothie made with fruit, milk and protein powder works well if you’ll be working out relatively soon after eating; a turkey sandwich and a bowl of soup at lunch will be pretty well digested if you’re going for a run in the mid-afternoon. If you work out in the mornings but you just don’t like breakfast foods, then eat whatever appeals to you. Most people don’t see anything ‘wrong’ with eating a bowl of cereal for dinner, so why should it be ‘wrong’ to eat leftovers for breakfast?.

When You Should Eat Before You Work Out

There are specific guidelines for meal timing – but in reality, you have to go with what feels right. Some people can eat as usual just before exercising, while others prefer a lighter load in the stomach. Generally speaking, the longer you have to digest your meal before you start working out, the larger and more solid your meal can be.

If you’re going to be working out within an hour or so of eating, then you’ll want a small semi-solid or liquid meal that will empty from your stomach relatively quickly. A smoothie, for example, would be light and easy to digest. If you’re going to work out in the mid-afternoon, a regular, well-balanced meal at lunch should have you covered. If you’ve got a hard workout scheduled right before dinner, you’ll need a light snack in the mid-afternoon – a carton of low-fat yogurt with some fruit would work.

How Much You Should Eat Before You Work Out

Some athletes like to know the specifics of what they should eat before a workout – and the guidelines are very specific. Most people just use the ‘trial and error’ method until they figure out the eating schedule that works for them.

For those of you who want to know the details, here they are: athletes are advised to eat between 1 and 4 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight (or, 0.5 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body weight) one to four hours before exercising. The reason for the range is that it depends on how soon you’re going to exercise after eating. The longer you have to digest, the more you can eat at the pre-exercise meal.

  • 1 hour to digest before exercise                    1 gram carbohydrate/kg body weight
  • 2 hours to digest before exercise                  2 grams carbohydrate/kg body weight
  • 3 hours to digest before exercise                  3 grams carbohydrate/kg body weight
  • 4 hours to digest before exercise                  4 grams carbohydrate/kg body weight

See my post ‘What are carbohydrates and how many ‘carbs’ do you need?’ for a list of foods with their carbohydrate content to help you plan your meals

Don’t Eat More Than You Burn

One final note – if your workouts aren’t particularly vigorous or lengthy, this advice may not apply to you. Not everyone needs to fuel up before exercising. If your routine consists of a 30-minute brisk walk in the morning, that’s a great regimen – but it’s also not so intense that you need to top off your tank before you head out.

Written by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD. Susan is a paid consultant for Herbalife. 

Susan Bowerman

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

All Herbalife products and nutritional/ beauty/success advice available from:
SABRINA
INDEPENDENT HERBALIFE DISTRIBUTOR SINCE 1994
Helping you enjoy a healthy, active and successful life!
https://www.goherbalife.com/goherb/
Call USA: +12143290702
Italia: +393462452282
Deutschland: +4952337093696

Add me at Facebook: http://sasafb.fitmy.biz